Nissan Intelligent Integration

GOOD THINGS HAPPEN WHEN CARS CONNECT WITH COMMUNITIES

NISSAN INTELLIGENT INTEGRATION

What if cars could do more than drive? What if they could learn and become smarter, providing information and feedback to the driver and other cars – and even power communities? It’s all part of Nissan’s Intelligent Integration effort, and it’s going to change the world.

CARS THAT THINK

The robot cars are coming. And they’re awesome. Nissan is developing the
Seamless Autonomous Mobility (SAM) system, which partners in-vehicle
artificial intelligence with remote human support, so driverless vehicles may be
able to make the right decisions in unpredictable situations. The SAM system
will also enable millions of autonomous vehicles to share information with
each other, passing on intelligence that helps them operate safely and
smoothly on the road.

AN ELECTRIC ECOSYSTEM

Electric is the future. You can drive it, store it, share it, sell it, chop it up, save it, or give it away.

EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

Driving electric is getting easier every day. An ever-expanding network of
charging stations is making sure of that. Nissan is constantly working with
governments and private companies to make plugging in as accessible as
possible. We’re especially focused on fast-charging and creating fast-charge
corridors around the world.

VEHICLE TO HOME

Now you can use your Nissan LEAF to power your home or the grid – or even bring power to those in need. When emergencies happen, the Vehicle to Home system can be leveraged as backup power. The system also enables you to store home-generated renewable energy – such as solar – in your Nissan LEAF battery, then draw on this power in the evening when energy costs are high. We’re also testing vehicle-to-grid systems, where Nissan LEAF owners can return energy from their cars back to the grid.

XSTORAGE HOME ENERGY SYSTEM

An initiative in Europe, xStorage gives Nissan’s electric vehicle batteries a second life. After they’re no longer powering cars, they still have enough juice to power energy storage systems for homes. Nissan partnered with Eaton to create a system that lets you control how and when to put the energy to use, so you can save money and take a load off the grid.

 

MOBILITY FOR EVERYONE

Everyone has a right to get around. We’re making it possible with Easy Ride and the ‘e-share mobi’ car-sharing program.

EASY RIDE – NISSAN ROBO-VEHICLE MOBILITY SERVICE

In the near future, you can pick your destination and call a robo-vehicle – all from an app. Working with DeNA, Nissan is already testing Easy Ride in the field, envisioned as an autonomous transportation service that helps people get around more freely. New to the area? You’ll be able to check out local hot spots or a sightseeing route – recommended by your friendly Easy Ride, of course.

E-SHARE MOBI

Car sharing brought to you by Nissan. An innovative program now in place in Japan, e-share mobi currently has no monthly membership fee and no additional distance-based fees. Daily cleaning keeps the vehicles clean and comfortable, and users can even get help with navigation and recommended routes from a live operator via phone.  


THE WORLD IS REALLY YOURS

Just touch a button, and you're dialed into everything you love, including friends, music, movies, food, and more.

GET CONNECTED

To the road. To your car. To your community. And to the world. Nissan vehicles
feature intuitive technology that gives you greater control over your driving
experience, starting with NissanConnect. A suite of advanced features and
apps – including Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and Amazon Alexa – allow you to
play your music, keep tabs on your social network, and navigate any city like a
local.

NISSAN DOOR TO DOOR NAVIGATION

Nissan Door to Door Navigation is just what it says: getting you all the way to your final destination. If you end up parking several blocks away, it will give you walking directions the rest of the way there – a great help in unfamiliar locations. Other features that make every drive a little easier include detailed real-time Premium Traffic, Bluetooth streaming audio, voice recognition, and more. 

OVER-THE-AIR MAP UPDATES

Keeping navigation current helps make sure you get where you want to go, when you want to get there. With over-the-air map updates, your Nissan Navigation System can update invisibly, behind the scenes – no visits to a dealer required. 

 

REMOTE ACCESS THROUGH SMART PHONE

Using the NissanConnect Services App, your smartphone gives you a VIP pass to your Nissan. Convenient features include Remote Engine Start/Stop, Remote Door Lock Unlock, and more. Want to impress your friends? You can even remotely access vehicle functions from your Apple Watch. 

 

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MID-CENTURY MODERN DESIGN: WHO AND WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW INSIDE LOOKING OUT

INSIDE LOOKING OUT

MID-CENTURY MODERN DESIGN: WHO AND WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

From screened-in porches to floating hotels, our desire to experience nature in the comfort of shelter is an enduring tension.

The need for shelter is ancient; the luxury to invite nature back inside is the result of early 20th century advancements in durable metals and stronger glass. These new materials gave innovative architects exactly what they needed to radically integrate the outdoors with our living spaces. The apex of this movement found expression in the mid-century modern style, particularly in the United States.

Frank Lloyd Wright was one of the first American architects to rethink bunker-like homes with few windows and bring us closer to our external surroundings. Inspired by how Japanese culture assimilated nature into interiors, he sought an indoor/outdoor integration with the Prairie School, a progressive American architectural style that rejected the formal Greek and Roman designs of Europe. During the first two decades of the 20th century, Wright promoted what he called “organic architecture.” This was the radical idea that the home should celebrate the landscape it is in, rather than standing in contrast to it.

...the home should celebrate the landscape it is in, rather than standing in contrast to it.

The International Style of the 1920s took things a step further, leaving behind ornament and color but favouring clean lines and simplicity. Mid-century modern design saw these ideals in their fullest expression. Breaking down walls to make way for open floorplans and expansive windows blurred the line between the sanctuary of the indoors and the wonder of the natural world.

As a rapidly growing metropolis in the 1930s and ’40s, Los Angeles, Calif., became a sandbox for architects, who were drawn by the open spaces, expanding need for housing, and the availability of industrial materials.

Let’s look at two exemplary mid-century modern homes in Los Angeles.

Photo by David Hartwell

NEUTRA VDL STUDIOS AND RESIDENCES – SILVER LAKE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

An architect at the beginning of their career better make their home extraordinary. In 1932, Richard Neutra designed his house in a way that feels open yet solitary with sweeping views. Located on a mere 60’ x 70’ (18m x 20m) lot, it rises two stories tall with abundant glass, a reflecting pool, a basement, and a penthouse with views of the nearby Silver Lake Meadow and Reservoir. The stairway serves as an axis for the small rooms on each floor. The colors and tones are neutral, and the furnishings are minimal. All this allows the senses to be saturated with light, air, space, and water. Although the original was destroyed by fire in 1963, Neutra and his son rebuilt the house. You can even visit, since the house and studio are open to the public. For more info, go to neutra-vdl.org.

Photo by David Hartwell

...a living room that seems to float out over the city.

CASE STUDY HOUSE #22 - HOLLYWOOD HILLS, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

In 1957, CH “Buck” and Carlotta Stahl hired a young architect to design their dream home. Built of exposed glass, steel, and concrete on a precarious hillside, the Stahl House would become a signature work. It was also part of the Case Study House program, an initiative by Arts and Architecture magazine that commissioned major architects to create inexpensive model homes as
a response to the U.S. housing boom.

On a perch high in the Hollywood Hills, the tricky location pays off with spectacular views of the mountains, downtown Los Angeles, and the Pacific Ocean. The design minimizes anything that may come between you and the surrounding vistas, with glass walls on three sides and, thanks to a cantilevered foundation, a living room that seems to float out over the city. The daring design and location have made the Stahl House a modernist icon.

Showcased in films, television shows, and pictorials, the house has also become a Los Angeles landmark. Its place in American culture was further cemented in 2013 when it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Case Study House #22 is still owned by the Stahl family and is open for tours. For more info, go to stahlhouse.com.

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Everything You Need To Know About Slow Travel

VACATION IN THE SLOW LANE

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SLOW TRAVEL

If you didn’t post a photo in front of the Reclining Buddha, did you even go to Bangkok? The age of social  media has inspired a tourism boom, the effects of which are felt around the world. The bucket lists and wanderlust can create many positives – as in Iceland, where a massive rise in tourism helped the country emerge from a financial crisis.

It is increasingly apparent that there is a more responsible, and enjoyable, way to see the world.

Too Much Of A Good Thing: Overtourism

Unfortunately, there is a less flattering angle to the rise of travel. In the Philippines, the picturesque Boracay Beach was closed to visitors after overtourism threatened fragile marine ecosystems. Residents of Venice, Italy, often resent tourists trampling all over the city with packed lunches, only to leave after they get their selfie. The city recently imposed an entrance fee to curb crowds.

Whirlwind trips that attempt to cover as many sites as possible are not necessarily the best experience for the traveler, either. It can leave you feeling more tired than when you left for vacation. Plus, if you spend time only around the Eiffel Tower or Machu Picchu, you might miss the hidden corners that reveal the true characters of Paris or Peru.

It is increasingly apparent that we can see the world in a more responsible and enjoyable way.

One approach is to simply slow down. The practice even has a name: slow travel. The antidote to exhausting checklist tourism, it is being embraced by full-time digital nomads (who blog about it at length) and also 9-to-5 employees on holiday. You don’t need a lot of time to travel slowly. 

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

The gist of slow travel is that you travel to fewer places, spend more time in each destination, and live like a local rather than a tourist. Proponents of the movement say it puts less stress on travelers and locals, it’s cost effective, and it can be less damaging to the environment.

Below are some ways you can practice slow travel on your next holiday.

1
PLAN FOR NO PLANS


If you have only a week of vacation time, stay in the same place for the entire week. Allow time to get to know your surroundings and discover things you can’t find in a guidebook. If you loved a café, go back. Get to know the people serving your coffee. They’ll probably have good advice on what to see and where else to eat.

2
STAY IN IF YOU FEEL LIKE IT
Try out the local market, and cook in your vacation rental. See how your favorite recipes taste with unfamiliar spices and produce

3
BE A NEIGHBOR
Rent a home or apartment. Take it one step further, and house-sit or do a homestay. You likely can get a much better feel for a place when you choose to stay in a neighborhood instead of a resort or the downtown hotel district. You probably won’t have your sheets changed every day, but you may get a better feel for the local culture

4
FIND YOUR PEOPLE
Love kayaking? Brewing beer? Crochet? Seek out local clubs or festivals.

5
SLOW DOWN. LITERALLY

When you’re traveling somewhere like Europe or Japan, take the long route, and travel via train. There’s much more to see below cruising altitude. After reaching your destination, bike, walk, and smell the roses. If you’re not going far, there’s nothing like public transit to get a feel for the locals’ daily life. You can even take it to the Reclining Buddha or the Eiffel Tower.

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FROM POLAND TO JAPAN IN AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE

LEAVING NO TRACE

FROM POLAND TO JAPAN IN A ZERO-EMISSION NISSAN LEAF

nissan-propilot-park-driver-po-1.jpg

In physics, there’s a theory called the Observer Effect. It states that simply observing a situation or phenomenon necessarily changes that phenomenon.

The same happens in travel. An influx of visitors to the temple complex in Angkor Wat, Cambodia, have created such wear and tear that many sections have had to be repaired or closed.

It‘s easy to see how tourism can create a negative physical effect where we travel. But looking deeper, we’re learning that there’s a less visible, but perhaps more damaging effect on the culture and economy of the destinations we visit. 

A NEW WAY TO TRAVEL OUR WORLD

Some people are exploring new ways to see things authentically as they are, and do as little harm in the process. Welcome to sustainable travel.   

MEET MAREK KAMINSKI Polar explorer, author, photographer, and entrepreneur.

Kaminski recently took a 3-month, 16,000 km road trip from Zakopane, Poland to Tokyo, Japan in a zero-emission Nissan LEAF. Named #NoTraceExpedition, he passed through eight countries over two continents, including some of the most rugged terrain in Russia, Mongolia, and China. Sustainability for the trip went beyond creating no carbon emissions. Marek set things up to minimize the formation of garbage, while creating a house on wheels: tent, repair kit, food and cooking supplies – even a bed that let him stretch out full-length inside the LEAF.

He’s no stranger to extreme travel – he’s the first man to have visited the North and South Poles in the same year – and he did this solo. While this got him in the Guinness book of records, his real reward is to save the planet, and make the world we live in better for everyone. He even created a foundation that assists young people with disabilities, helping them travel to the polar regions, even having them take part in actual expeditions.    

"For me, this journey
is not just about reaching my destination – it is also about
making a simple, brilliant change to be more
sustainable…"

MORE OPPORTUNITIES TO CONNECT AND LEARN

While covering this much ground in a 100% electric vehicle provides some unique challenges, it has rewards, too. The time required to charge his LEAF gave him the opportunity to spend time with local communities, to learn about them, and share the vision of sustainable travel. From modern cities in Russia, China, and Japan, to rural communities in Siberia and Mongolia – some that had never seen an electric vehicle before – Marek and his LEAF saw it all.

And while the roads, weather conditions, languages and cultures were vast and diverse, he also found common ground where a concern about our planet, and a commitment to make a brighter future were common themes.

"People understand that
travelling long distance by EV is
not easy, but they really
understood you care about the
environment, so they want to
help with electricity, food, a place
to stay"

PERFECT TRAVELING PARTNER

Just as interesting, Kaminski’s LEAF had almost no modifications to take on this legendary journey. To allow him to plug in the car to a variety of charging equipment he might encounter, Marek had a versatile set of adapters custom-built.

The LEAF proved to be 100% reliable during his expedition, with no breakdowns of any kind. He points out that the ProPILOT – Nissan’s hands-on driving assistant designed to help drivers during long highway trips and stop and go traffic helped keep him relaxed on long stints behind the wheel.

"The quietness of an EV makes the drive much easier – like a moving meditation – letting me enjoy what I see, giving me quiet time to think..."

EXPLORING FARTHER AND SMARTER

While that epic journey might seem like a once-in-a-lifetime trip, Kaminski and NoTrace are getting ready for an even greater journey. In 2019, he plans to drive a Nissan EV on a global expedition to share the vision and the reality of sustainable travel and living. Exciting new technologies will be along for the ride; Marek will provide a prototype artificial intelligence
system that he’ll use as his copilot, designed not only to help guide, but to study global climate situations.  

AI will be a next-level addition to a skill set he developed on the first NoTrace Expedition – driving in typhoons, snow storms, thunderstorms and more. He says the 16,000-kilometer trip gave him 16,000 pieces of information.

READY FOR YOUR OWN EXPEDITION?

While Marek’s resume makes him superbly capable for this journey, he says sustainable travel is for everyone – even a grand adventure in an EV. His advice – “Be prepared, but don’t be afraid”. The trick is planning, planning, planning.

With social media and the internet, you can find like-minded enthusiasts to help you. And with an EV, a little special care is needed to make sure you can find places to charge – and ways to pay for them. Some require special charge cards that you’ll need to order in advance. It’s worth doing -the rewards of seeing the world, the people and the environment we all share far outweigh the challenges. 

So, without a drop of gas used, in places that may have never even seen an EV, Marek and his Nissan LEAF have created an entirely new vision of road travel. And have seen some amazing things in the process.

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HOME SWEET 3D PRINTED HOME

BUILDING A BETTER WORLD ONE LAYER AT A TIME

HOME SWEET 3D PRINTED HOME

These 3D printed homes can be personalized and designed in ways never before possible.

Once the realm of science fiction stories and inspiring TED Talks, 3D printed homes are rapidly becoming a reality. Teams of architects, engineers, and entrepreneurs have developed custom 3D printing machines designed to print a small home layer by layer, in less than a day, for a fraction of traditional construction costs. 

But it isn’t all about creating a home for less. These 3D printed homes can be personalized and designed in ways never before possible. So, they aren’t just more attainable: They can provide a level of design aesthetic equal to some of the most expensive handcrafted homes. Before we get into some of the current pioneers of this technology, it might help to know more history on 3D printed housing.

HOW DID THE 3D PRINTED HOUSE GET ITS START?

We need to go all the way back to the 1950s to explore the initial seeding of the technology. It was then that the first concept of a robotic bricklayer began to surface. Of course, at the time, the vision far outweighed the tools of the time. Development of automated fabrication of entire buildings using slip-forming techniques and robotic assembly of components, akin to 3D printing, were pioneered in Japan to 1980s and 1990s. It sped up the construction process but didn’t provide the freedom of design that many desired. 

Fast forward several decades, and technology finally caught up with engineering visions. The first inhabitable 3D printed home was erected in Nantes, France, in April 2018. The University of Nantes and the Nantes Digital Sciences Laboratory developed the five-bedroom home, and a machine called the Batiprint3D built its frame in 18 days. It ushered in the maturity of the technology – and a race to commercialize it around the world. 

WHY THE RISE OF 3D PRINTED HOMES NOW?

Shelter is one of the most basic human needs, yet according to the United Nations, over one billion people worldwide live in sub-standard housing. Think of ramshackle homes fortified with scrap metal and founded on unfinished or dirt flooring. 

It’s a serious and growing problem – and one that traditional construction methods are not equipped to handle. Luckily, a few forward-thinking companies are turning to 3D printing to help alleviate this housing crisis. And one in particular has a very ambitious goal. 

Shelter is one of the most basic human needs, yet according to the United Nations, over one billion people worldwide live in sub-standard housing.

MEET MAREK KAMINSKI Polar explorer, author, photographer, and entrepreneur.

WORKING TOGETHER TOWARDS AN AFFORDABLE SOLUTION

New Story, a nonprofit based in San Francisco, aims to use this transformative technology to build entire communities of 3D printed dwellings that are not only aesthetically pleasing but extremely affordable. It plans on working with each community directly to incorporate as many of their needs as possible. 

Because the housing is built using software, it’s possible to offer options for different designs, depending on family size. Starting off big, they plan on building an entire community of 3D printed homes in Latin America in 2019. If that sounds ambitious, just consider the nonprofit’s resume. It has built over 850 traditionally constructed homes in Bolivia, El Salvador, and Haiti. On top of that, it has funded over 1,400 worldwide. It’s safe to say it has the right background for this project. But it had one big hurdle to overcome. While New Story had the willpower to get it done, it still needed the engineering might.

A PARTNERSHIP BASED ON A SHARED PASSION

ICON, the engineering minds behind an ingenious 3D printer that builds the walls of a house one concrete layer at a time, turned out to be the perfect partner. New Story says of ICON, “A year ago, the technology we needed didn’t exist. That’s when we began working with ICON to create a solution to a seemingly unsolvable problem.” The exciting result? The Vulcan, a 3D printer designed to print a home for less than $4,000 in less than 24 hours.

And it’s clear from what Jason Ballard, co-founder and CEO of ICON, has to say that these two partners are on the same page. “It’s our mission at ICON to re-imagine the approach to homebuilding and construction and make affordable, dignified housing available to everyone throughout the world.”

It’s that kind of shared mindset, combined with the drive and ambition of both New Story and ICON, that is propelling the project in Latin America forward – and potentially many more to come.

PRINTING A COMMUNITY IS JUST THE BEGINNING

Assuming its first large-scale 3D printing project goes as planned, New Story aims to fully shift to 3D printing. The team envisions plotting routes to bring the printers from community to community in countries around the world. It’s also open to sharing the technology with others as a way of speeding up the process. 

Who knows? With the rapid advancement of this technology, there’s a good chance you may one day soon sit down with an architect, design your dream home on a computer, and move into it the very next day.

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MEET HIROSHI ISHIGURO, THE MAN WHO MAKES A.I. MORE HUMAN

THE FUTURE IS ROBOTIC

MEET HIROSHI ISHIGURO, THE MAN WHO MAKES A.I. MORE HUMAN

To famed roboticist and Nissan technology consultant Hiroshi Ishiguro, how well people accept artificial intelligence depends on one thing above all: how human it is. To Ishiguro, a more humanlike presence makes A.I. easier to accept, fostering what he calls “natural interaction” between human and machines.

In Las Vegas at CES to help present new in-vehicle technology from Nissan, the shaggy-haired, chill-vibed Ishiguro stood out against a backdrop of businesslike automotive execs. What was he doing there? What did Nissan hire him to do? “Concept building,” Ishiguro said without much elaboration. In the competitive field of technology where secrecy rules, we can’t blame Ishiguro for being tight-lipped. To really understand why Nissan hired him, you need to know more about Ishiguro and his work.

ROBOT DESIGNER.
ANDROID SPECIALIST.
ARTIST.

Blessing the lifeless with life is a specialized trade. In this small but important field, there’s an elite group of innovators/leaders. Fittingly, Ishiguro’s the director of the Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, part of the Department of Systems Innovation in the Graduate School of Engineering Science at Osaka University in Japan. That’s just his day job. On the side, he’s a bit of an internet sensation.

Search his name online, you’ll see Ishiguro with eerily realistic androids he’s built – some of which have become internet celebrities in their own right. Among his creations are some of the most lifelike androids the world has seen, including Geminoid HI-1, Ishiguro’s virtual twin. The two so are strikingly similar, it’s actually difficult to tell them apart. After witnessing the artistry of these robots, Ishiguro’s previous calling should come as no surprise: He was once an aspiring oil painter.

“A machine that has a friendly voice today, will have a friendly face tomorrow.”

WHAT IT MEANS TO BE HUMAN, TO A ROBOT

In building his robots, Ishiguro’s honed in on what it means to be human – the nonverbal cues, the natural speech irregularities, the nuances that separate us from robots. He believes that his findings are integral to all the A.I. machines that humans will interact with in the future, the least of which are traditional robots. Technology companies are searching more and more for ways to give everyday devices and machines a more humanlike interface, and Ishiguro can help. 

“Everything is going to be humanlike in the future,” he says, and it’s difficult to disagree. With at-home assistants becoming as ubiquitous as microwaves, it’s becoming increasingly common to see humans interact with machinery rather than operate it. A machine with a friendly voice today can become a friendly face tomorrow.

MACHINES WITH EMOTION

As he pontificates on the future of A.I., Ishiguro makes an excellent point about the value of emotion in human/machine interaction. He gives the example of a mapping smartphone app that says voice directions to the driver of a car. In monotone robo-speak, Ishiguro reasons, certain things cannot be communicated, like a sense of urgency.

To Ishiguro, a navigation unit that says “Please stop” with a stern, serious tone is far more meaningful – it means your next navigational maneuver must happen NOW. Spoken calmly, this command conveys less urgency, meaning you probably don’t need to act immediately. Emotion, to Ishiguro, communicates valuable information to people, and our machines must learn to communicate it to us through verbal and nonverbal cues.

YOUR FIRST ROBOT MIGHT NOT BE A ROBOT

Conversing with Ishiguro reveals a widely held misconception about robots: the idea that the first robot we interact with will be the prototypical metal cyborg seen often in films. In reality, our first robots will probably be machines we already know, just with a little extra A.I. and a healthy dose of humanlike gestures.

The machine he would like to humanize most? Easy answer. The automobile, to Ishiguro, is like a “big robot” that we can make “more humanlike.”

Perhaps the biggest obstacle to humans adopting autonomous vehicles is one of trust. Would it be less scary to let a car drive you through rush traffic if the car had a face, a voice, and a calming demeanor? Time will tell.

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NISSAN IS FIRST JAPANESE AUTOMAKER TO ENTER FORMULA E

WORLD'S BEST-SELLING EV MAKER READY TO POWER-UP ELECTRIC RACING SERIES

NISSAN IS FIRST JAPANESE AUTOMAKER TO ENTER FORMULA E

– Alfonso Albaisa, Senior VP of Global Design

“...the released power of a sonic wave inspired our celebration of EV racing.”

While this coming season will be Nissan’s first in Formula E, the zero-emission Nissan LEAF has been a global best seller since its debut in 2010. That means Nissan will be bringing over four billion kilometers of LEAF mileage to the race track. In addition, with manufacturers competing from around the globe, there is the added excitement of Nissan being the first Japanese automaker to enter the cutting-edge world of Formula E. 

FORMULA FOR EXCITEMENT

FORMULA E 2.0 – SERIOUS UPGRADES RAISE THE STAKES

Nissan has picked a perfect time to enter Formula E – as the second-generation cars get ready to debut the most advanced technology in EV motorsports, a huge step forward over previous models. They also show how rapidly the lessons learned in racing could affect future EV vehicles for the street.

In just the first four seasons of Formula E, advancements in battery and electric motor technology have doubled the range, enabling the cars to go faster and be more energy-efficient. The new second-generation race cars, with 1-100 km/h (0-62 mph) time of 2.8 seconds, and a top speed of over 280 km/h (174 mph), promise racing that will be as exciting as the advances in technology.

BEYOND THE SPEED OF SOUND

The aerodynamic body for electric racers presents a different livery design challenge than their internal combustion counterparts. For Alfonso Albaisa, Nissan’s Senior Vice President of Global Design, flight and sound became important themes.

“At first glance, the season five Formula E car looked to our design team like a supersonic bird in flight,” he said. “While Formula E racers are virtually silent, they deliver electrifying bursts of speed. This, combined, with visualization of the Doppler Effect generated our livery.”

NISSAN TAKES IT TO THE STREETS

Nissan will race in 12 cities on four continents during season five of the ABB FIA Formula E Championship series. An exciting backdrop to racing thrills, the series will include Hong Kong, Marrakesh, Monaco, Berlin, and Paris, with the season wrapping up in New York.

WHO WINS THE BIG PRIZE? WE ALL DO.

There is an old saying: “Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday” – winning in motorsport equals success on the showroom floor. And with a racing history that goes back to 1936, Nissan loves to compete.

But Formula E is different – it is not just going to sell a few cars or create some new race fans. The advances in EV technology that come from racing will change how we drive, and even how we live.

It’s the same kind of vision that drives Nissan Intelligent Mobility: redefining power with zero-emissions technology, developing innovative systems that reduce stress and make driving more fun, and looking forward toward a future when Nissan vehicles can even power your home.

And for Nissan, whose focus is to electrify the world, it’s the perfect place to drive the future forward at an exhilarating pace.

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NISSAN’S IMX KURO CONCEPT CAR BRINGS THE OUTDOORS IN, ALONG WITH OTHER BOLD IDEAS

CAR BRINGS THE OUTDOORS IN, ALONG WITH OTHER BOLD IDEAS

NISSAN'S IMX KURO CONCEPT CAR BRINGS THE OUTDOORS IN, ALONG WITH OTHER BOLD IDEAS

A car that reads your mind and an interior that seems to disappear before your eyes. Science fiction? Not anymore. The IMx KURO crossover concept vehicle is the epitome of Nissan design and a showcase for Nissan Intelligent Mobility, including electric power, autonomous technology, and connectivity. It’s a bold mix of ideas. An artistic blend of indoor and outdoor spaces. Science that transfers your thoughts directly from your brain to your car. All in one futuristic car.

BEAUTY OF THE OUTSIDE WORLD BROUGHT INSIDE

The IMx KURO plays with contrasting ideas, including indoor space and outdoor space. It takes its cues from Japanese concepts of ma, a sense of space and time, and wa, the coexistence of two seemingly contradictory concepts – “stillness” and “motion.”

It’s this juxtaposition that inspired the development of one of the IMx KURO’s iconic features – a dashboard that is actually a panoramic OLED display. Cameras placed on the exterior capture a real-time image of the outside world and display it on the dashboard, making it seem as if car and steel disappear, giving you the sense that you’re traveling through an open space.

This sense of openness is echoed throughout the interior design, from the small details like the etched headrests that feature an open diagonal pattern to the big details like a driver’s seat that reclines and a steering wheel that stows away when autonomous driving is activated.

It’s a marriage of inside space and outside space that helps create something new, unexpected, and exciting while maintaining a sense of relaxation and privacy.

INTELLIGENT POWER: AN ELEVATED LEVEL OF DRIVING EXCITEMENT

The Nissan IMx KURO was built with the knowledge that the best part of driving is… well, driving. And that’s no more evident than in the IMx KURO’s powertrain.

The IMx KURO launches with high-output electric motors at the front and rear, which not only makes it an all-wheel-drive vehicle but provides power that quickly introduces drivers to their seat backs. The motors produce 320 kW of power and an astounding 700 Nm of torque – more than the Nissan GT-R supercar – all from a high-capacity battery that’s been redesigned and re-engineered for increased energy density. Positioned low in the chassis and providing a flat underbody, this battery lowers the vehicle’s centre of gravity for fun-to-drive power and handling.

Perhaps best of all, this new battery provides a range of over 600 km on a single charge, so when you’ve found your groove, you don’t have to stop to top off.

"The IMx KURO zero-emission crossover concept vehicle embodies the future of Nissan Intelligent Mobility..."

– José Muñoz, Nissan's Chief Performance Officer

2:59 IMx KURO

INTELLIGENT DRIVING: MORE THAN AUTONOMOUS DRIVING, YOUR CAR WILL KNOW WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO NEXT

The IMx KURO is equipped with fully autonomous driving that can watch the road for you and respond to other vehicles on the road to safely get you to your destination. It takes over driving when you want it to, but you can always put yourself back at the controls.

Nissan envisions a future where more autonomy, electrification, and connectivity make driving more exciting and engaging.

Getting there is going to require a lot of brain power – yours, to be exact. That’s why Nissan’s Brain-to-Vehicle (B2V) technology puts your mind in the driver’s seat. B2V measures the driver’s brainwaves, which are then analyzed by the vehicle’s onboard autonomous systems. The IMx KURO can tell if a driver’s expectations match reality, and it can engage its systems to turn the wheel or slow itself down faster than the average human response time.

And when it’s in autonomous mode, it applies what it’s learned about how you like to drive and takes that into account for a fully autonomous drive adapted to your level of comfort.

What does all that mean, really? It means the IMx KURO can detect and evaluate how you’re feeling, predict your next move, and step in to provide a more seamless and exciting drive.

INTELLIGENT INTEGRATION: IMX CONNECTS TO YOU AND THE WIDER WORLD

The IMx KURO will autonomously take you where you need to go, like dropping you off at the airport. While you’re away, it can even park in a spot where it can return power to the local electrical grid. And when it’s time to pick you from your return flight, it’ll charge up ahead of time and meet you at the terminal. It’s all part of connected-car technologies, including Seamless Autonomous Mobility.

Driver or Car? Indoor or Outdoor? Power or Serenity? Why not all? This is a melding of seemingly contradictory concepts to create an experience behind the wheel unlike anything else.

CHECK OUT THIS NISSAN WITH ZERO EMISSIONS ELECTRIC POWER

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